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The time is now

      To stop being a student. To quit guessing. To help people who need you the most. To get paid what you’re worth. To accept the risk and fear of doing what you want to do. To create the change you want to make. To build a career you’re proud of, and a life…

 

 

 

To stop being a student.

To quit guessing.

To help people who need you the most.

To get paid what you’re worth.

To accept the risk and fear of doing what you want to do.

To create the change you want to make.

To build a career you’re proud of, and a life you don’t need to escape from.

To do work that matters.

To call yourself a nurse.

The CPNRE Comprehensive Review eBook is launching today, to give you instant access to just the information you need to know for the CPNRE.

It might be exactly what you need to help you become the nurse you’ve always wanted to be. Find out more here.

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A nurse’s journey

I have learned that what I have always wanted in life wasn’t to be educated, to travel, to be rich, or have authority, but to do work that matters to me. I have found that I have the least amount of interest in working with sick people. I have realized that I am finished with…

I have learned that what I have always wanted in life wasn’t to be educated, to travel, to be rich, or have authority, but to do work that matters to me.

I have found that I have the least amount of interest in working with sick people.

I have realized that I am finished with stifling my interests to work in a system that doesn’t fit me and most of the people it serves.

And I have started to wonder whether we all experience a similar journey in life before doing meaningful work.

A journey of learning, experiencing and seeing things we cannot unsee. A journey of sacrifices, failures and suffering, that teaches us important lessons, and shapes us to do the work we’re supposed to do.

You know, the kind of journey where you hit rock bottom.

Here’s mine:

From age 30 to 32, my family and friends will tell you that I was miserable. During that time I hustled as a nurse practitioner in a small rural town, working 50 hours a week, hiding from every problem I saw. I was constantly stressed, unable to sleep, and too afraid of what might happen if I spoke the truth. I spent every day trying to catch up from the day before, only to fall further and further behind. At one point I was hypertensive and handed a prescription for Amplodipine… and yet I couldn’t stop. No one could stop me. 

I was powerless to quit until one day, it ended. 

I recall the exact moment when I couldn’t fathom living another day distracting myself from problems and doing work that didn’t matter, just to make a pay check.

The moment when I was done with saying “my boss won’t let me”.

The moment when I suddenly understood who I was, who I wasn’t, and what I was meant to do with my life.

I survived the ordeal of burning out from the realities of working in a broken health care system. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Hitting bottom changed me forever.

When we know that the pain and suffering we’ve experienced was worth it, and when we believe everything that’s happened to us was only getting us ready to be our true selves, and do what scares us – that is when a nurse’s journey begins.

A nurse’s real journey is about doing the work that chooses us. The time before is a rehearsal preparing us to thrive when our plans fail, and plans almost always do.

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Applying for work

Is a competition for attention. Getting hired requires you to tell a true story that resonates with the people who are hiring you. A story about how you can help solve their problems, meet their needs and achieve their goals. Sending out a bunch of the same cover letters and resumes to different health care…

Is a competition for attention.

Getting hired requires you to tell a true story that resonates with the people who are hiring you. A story about how you can help solve their problems, meet their needs and achieve their goals.

Sending out a bunch of the same cover letters and resumes to different health care organizations isn’t the greatest way of getting hired anymore. Not for the best nursing jobs, anyways.

In a connected and competitive marketplace, people look for reasons not to hire you. If you have spelling mistakes, average work experiences, no remarkable achievements or a poor reputation, you may not get the attention you want.

Today, getting the best jobs requires you to be vulnerable and do what your competition isn’t doing. What if you:

  • attach letters of recommendation with your resume?
  • share a project you’re working on?
  • provide a copy of a book you wrote?
  • show a website you own?
  • tell a story about a program you developed?
  • write a manifesto about how you’re transforming health care?

Nurses who land the best jobs get far because their past and their reputation echoes with the people they hope to work for, not because of their resume.

Standing out is seriously underrated, and fitting in won’t get you where you want to go. The only person stopping you from daring to be different is you.

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Thriving as a nurse in today’s world

Demands us to do things differently. Apple wan’t the first company to build the personal computer, and Amazon wasn’t the first online store. The reason Apple is Apple and Amazon is Amazon is because they’ve done things their competitors chose not to do. In nearly every industry, the most successful people and organizations are making a difference by doing…

Demands us to do things differently.

Apple wan’t the first company to build the personal computer, and Amazon wasn’t the first online store. The reason Apple is Apple and Amazon is Amazon is because they’ve done things their competitors chose not to do.

In nearly every industry, the most successful people and organizations are making a difference by doing things that haven’t been done before. They’re thriving because they look at the status quo and do the opposite. On purpose.

Unfortunately in health care, many providers fight to maintain the status quo of a system that isn’t working by prioritizing quantity over quality. It’s not that they can’t see fewer people or increase the amount of time they spend with them, it’s that they won’t slow down long enough to think about how they could provide the kind of care people really need. 

But there are health care providers who do choose to focus on quality rather than quantity. It’s not that they can’t see more people more quickly, it’s that they won’t short-cut care.

As more people have more choices about who provides their health care, success will come to those of us who obsess about the ways in which we will help them.

Now, more than ever before, having credentials and being first matters less than the work we actually do. Today’s world rewards people who have the guts to do what other people won’t.

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Great nursing is real marketing

Promotion and publicity used to be effective ways of marketing nursing. With enough noise, we could reach the people who didn’t know or appreciate the work we do. But in a world of infinite choices, limited time and scarce attention, the marketing tactics that worked for over a hundred years are failing. The only real…

Promotion and publicity used to be effective ways of marketing nursing. With enough noise, we could reach the people who didn’t know or appreciate the work we do.

But in a world of infinite choices, limited time and scarce attention, the marketing tactics that worked for over a hundred years are failing.

The only real way to market nursing these days is for our work to be remarkable.

Rather than wasting time and effort advertising advocating for ourselves, we should be spending our time being who people need us to be. When we see clients for who they are and deliver care based on their needs, marketing the profession will take care of itself.

Taking time to listen, keeping promises, being respectful, providing evidence-based care, understanding needs, and empowering clients to take control of their health – these tactics are real marketing. 

The ‘patient experience’ shouldn’t be an after-thought. It should be the reason we do what we do. Real marketing should be built into our work from the beginning.

Google, Amazon, Starbucks, and Lululemon aren’t successful because they market themselves after the fact. They’re successful because their remarkable products and experiences speak for themselves.

If marketing is the act of telling a story that resonates with the people we seek to reach, then great nursing is marketing.

Nursing will be the most valued and respected when we create experiences clients actually want.

That means we better quit advertising ourselves, and begin innovating. It’s all we’ve got left.

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